Lifestyle

Sagitine Storage Solutions With A Touch Of Modernity

Sagitine Storage Solutions With A Touch Of Modernity

The never-ending quest for storage in Hong Kong means that new options — any options — are worth listening to. With as many different needs and demands as there are people in the SAR, there’s room in the market for all manner of container or service.

The latest to enter the fray is former finance professional-turned-designer Tina Clark, a native of Australia with several years in Hong Kong under her belt, and her Sagitine line. A combination of storage and organisational solution, the stacking, multi-purpose boxes are designed to be used as a single unit — for, say, seasonal sports gear or old photos under the bed — or in combination with frames and stands to create furniture. We all know there are plenty of boxes to be found in Hong Kong. A quick look through Jusco or Japan Home Centre proves that. The difference with Sagitine is that its boxes are not eyesores that need to be hidden away.

Naturally, necessity was the mother of invention in this case. “I was looking for some storage boxes and found them all to be really ugly,” states Clark bluntly. “I searched for two years and couldn’t find anything as gorgeous as the dresses I wanted to store. So, I decided to make my own.” True to her word, the Sagitine boxes, named after particularly swish cities like Santiago, Milan, Marrakesh and Clark’s native Sydney, come in three sizes ideal for our most often stored items: clothing, shoes and fashion accessories.

The boxes are constructed from a high grade and sustainable cardboard and adorned with leather handles. The paper lining bears the Sagitine monogram that resembles the vintage interior of a steamer trunk, and the outside finish recalls a sleek vinyl. “I designed the curves and the leather handles,” explains Clark. “Andrew Simpson and Michael Thorogood from Vert Designs took my ideas and made them a reality.”

The range of box shapes and sizes may seem moderate, but it nonetheless ensures every apartment is likely to have a corner that will accommodate a Sagitine set, be it low and wide or tall and thin; shoes, for example, can be stored in single “drawers” (with the Sydney and stand) that go up. “The Sydney and The Shanghai shoe stands are serious space savers,” says Clark. “They can hold 30 and 14 pairs of shoes respectively in a very small space.” But as any creative designer will tell you, a shoe stand doesn’t necessarily have to be for shoes. The individual box (called the Milan) measures roughly 30 x 22 x 12 centimetres, is perfect for kids’ toys, baby clothes, even our daily unmentionables at a push. The box stands and sets, with their larger volumes, create furniture almost out of thin air, and are designed to meld into existing spaces. Some are large enough to hold items like spare linens. In black or white (with black and natural brown leather trim), the Sagitine sets are modern, classical, masculine, feminine … whatever they need to be.

In the event you are storing clothing and other fashionable titbits, Sagitine also makes a range of accessories — muslin bags, clothes brushes, fabric refreshers — for the day you finally pull that ball gown or tuxedo out of hibernation. Be warned however: these are not cheap, plastic JHC containers. Sagitine’s prices can range up approximately $14,000. Depending on how you feel about your designer duds, it could be worth it. And ultimately, Clark hopes her customers are going to come away with something very basic in the long run. “Organisation with style.”